LAUREN DAIGLE & HOMOSEXUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN MODERN CHRISTIANITY

While driving in my car the other day, I heard the end of a news snippet about how Lauren Daigle (a Christian recording artist) supposedly compromised her faith. The reporter was not only extremely harsh in his criticism of Daigle, but he was also outright condemning toward her. Since I had just tuned in, I didn’t catch exactly what he was condemning her for. Therefore, as soon as I got back to my home, I did a quick Google search.

What I found is that Lauren Daigle had been asked a question on The Domenick Nati Show. Daigle was asked, “Do you feel that homosexuality is a sin?” Here is her response below:

I can’t honestly answer on that. In a sense, I have too many people that I love that they are homosexual. I don’t know. I actually had a conversation with someone last night about it. I can’t say one way or the other. I’m not God. So when people ask questions like that … that’s what my go-to is. I just say, ‘Read the Bible and find out for yourself.’ And when you find out let me know, because I’m learning too.

My immediate thoughts were, “That was it?” “This is why Lauren Daigle is being condemned?” I then did a little more research and found article after article and video after video from ministers and fans alike harshly criticizing and attacking Daigle while threatening and/or promising to boycott her as an artist.

After thinking about the situation, I decided it would be beneficial to look at this instance as a case study of modern Christianity; a case study of what is wrong with the way many Christians view and live out their Christianity.

GROUP THINKING vs. PERSONAL FAITH

In my book (A Different Kind of Poison: How Legalism Destroys Grace), I discuss the problem of Groupthink. Instead of Christians speaking for their own personal beliefs and convictions, some Christians tend to speaks in terms of “we” or “us.” Instead of having a deep and personal faith, some have demonstrated a shallow and general faith. While Christianity is designed to be a community, it is also very individualized (Phil. 2:12-13). Daigle needs to be commended because she answered the question as it was asked. She answered it from her own faith (notice the use of “l” and “I’m” in her response – she is taking responsibility for her beliefs, not anybody else’s beliefs).

Daigle was asked what she felt about homosexuality. There is only one person who can answer for Lauren Daigle and that is Lauren Daigle (1 Cor. 2:11). Getting upset on the basis of Daigle giving her own thoughts only demonstrates how some Christians prefer groupthink over personal faith. They don’t want Daigle to answer for herself; they want Daigle to answer for them the way they would answer it. This exposes a big problem in Christendom today.

GUARDED vs. VULNERABLE

Once Daigle makes it clear she is answering only for herself, she is then very vulnerable. She admits it is tough for her. She alludes to how she has many friends who are homosexual. She is simply being honest. Let me say that one more time. She is being honest. Whether you agree or disagree with her conclusion and approach is beside the point right here because she is being open with her feelings.

Right now, it seems more than ever Christianity needs vulnerability. It is no wonder, however, as to why more Christians are not openly vulnerable with their thoughts. As soon as someone is vulnerable and brave enough to give a differing thought (or a differing approach), they are blasted by their own “community.” Unfortunately, the criticism against Daigle didn’t end there.

Instead of everyone taking Daigle at her word, she has been demonized by some in the Christian community. Her intent is being attacked. She has been accused of compromising, wanting more fame, wanting more money, etc. Instead of assuming Daigle is telling the truth with her own feelings and showing her love, patience, and gentleness, some have opted to be the judge and jury of Daigle’s heart. Christianity in many places has not been a place of vulnerability where people can openly share as they grow. No, it has become a guarded assembly of deceitful conformity.

PRETENTIOUSNESS vs. HUMILITY

Daigle concludes her answer by admitting that she isn’t God. She then points people to the ultimate standard – the Bible. She encourages people to go to the Bible and develop their own faith. It needs to be noted that whether someone is or isn’t a homosexual has nothing to do with Daigle or Daigle’s faith. Daigle is not the standard and she acknowledges that. She then ends by admitting that she is still learning and growing in her knowledge and faith.

All I can see in Daigle’s answer is vulnerability, honesty, and humility. It reminds me of Jesus and the many times He side-stepped issues by not entangling himself in questions designed to inflame those around Him based upon the current culture (Mk. 11:31-33; Mt. 21:23-27; Lk. 20:20-26; etc.). Instead of getting caught up in a question set up for failure, she side-steps the attack and points people to God and the Bible. Unfortunately, there are some in the Christian camp who are upset for Daigle pointing people to the Scriptures.

CONCLUSION

What this case study shows is that some (dare I say many) in Christendom today are greatly missing personal faith, vulnerability, and honesty. More importantly, not only are these traits missing, they are traits that are being unintentionally condemned. People aren’t leaving churches because the music is too loud (or not loud enough). They aren’t leaving churches because the preacher isn’t eloquent enough. They aren’t leaving because there aren’t enough ministries.

On the contrary, far too often they are leaving because they are blasted when they ask questions or aren’t sure about things “they should already know.” They are leaving because they are tired of being judged and criticized before they even have a chance to develop and mature in their own understanding. They are leaving because honesty and vulnerability are no longer welcome.

If you don’t believe me, ask Lauren Daigle who is now being condemned by her own. No, not because she is a homosexual or even an advocate of homosexuality; but because she isn’t condemning the way the church thinks she should be. The way that the Christian community at large as handled this situation is yet another advertisement for what the church has become in many places.

Humans will always be attracted to those who truly love them. It is a shame when those of the world resemble love more so than those who claim to be disciples of Jesus (Jn. 13:35). It is hard to be vulnerable, it is hard to be honest, and it is very hard to have your own faith. Yet, Daigle exemplified all of these traits.

Ironically, Daigle’s actions demonstrate the very lyrics she sings. I will leave you with the lyrics to her song “You Say.” Perhaps it is the voices of some in the Christian community she now finds herself fighting against. I hope we can reverse that and show one another the grace, mercy, love, and patience we want to be shown toward us.

I keep fighting voices in my mind that say I’m not enough
Every single lie that tells me I will never measure up
Am I more than just the sum of every high and every low?
Remind me once again just who I am, because I need to know (ooh oh)

You say I am loved when I can’t feel a thing
You say I am strong when I think I am weak
You say I am held when I am falling short
When I don’t belong, oh You say that I am Yours
And I believe (I), oh I believe (I)
What You say of me (I)
I believe

The only thing that matters now is everything You think of me
In You I find my worth, in You I find my identity, (ooh oh)

You say I am loved when I can’t feel a thing
You say I am strong when I think I am weak
And You say I am held when I am falling short
When I don’t belong, oh You say that I am Yours
And I believe (I), oh I believe (I)
What You say of me (I)
Oh, I believe

Taking all I have and now I’m laying it at Your feet
You have every failure God, and You’ll have every victory, (ooh oh)

You say I am loved when I can’t feel a thing
You say I am strong when I think I am weak
You say I am held when I am falling short
When I don’t belong, oh You say that I am Yours
And I believe (I), oh I believe (I)
What You say of me (I)
I believe

Oh I believe (I), yes I believe (I)
What You say of me (I)
Oh I believe (oh)

 

– Kevin Pendergrass

3 comments

  1. Sarah Carver says:

    Thank you so much for taking the time and writing this article! I love this perspective and admittedly I was tempted to be put off by the content for which it is written, but God. I was moved with compassion to choose love for Lauren and continue to believe the best. Love believes the best AND Love NEVER fails. ❤️ Great article! Thanks so much!!

  2. This is fantastic! Thank you for your approach and for reminding us what we often forget…we are ALL sinners who need a Savior. So often, we look at people as the sum of their sin, not as fellow sinners in need of the saving message of grace. People forget, we aren’t sinners because we sin, we sin because we are sinners…it is what…we…are. There is a BIG difference between these two. Thanks be to God that when we put on Christ, God no longer sees our sin, He sees the Savior that He provided freely for everyone. Thanks again, just bought your book, cannot wait to read it!

    Blessings! Chip

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