Intro To The Old Testament

OVERVIEW OF THE OLD TESTAMENT

NOTES:

  • Why we study the Old Testament:
  • It is Scripture (2 Tim. 3:16-17).
  • It tells us who God is and how He interacted with His creation.
  • It admonishes and gives us comfort (1 Cor. 10:11; Rom. 15:4).
  • It helps us understand customs, the prophecies, context, etc.
  • The Old Testament Categorized (39 books total): The Law, Prophets & Psalms (Luke 24:44). To break it down even further:

 

  • Law (5 books): These are the Books of the Law, also known as The Pentateuch. They are the first five books of the Bible and of the Old Testament popularly referred to as the Books of Moses. They are:
  • Genesis
  • Exodus
  • Leviticus
  • Numbers
  • Deuteronomy

 

  • History (12 books): These are the books containing a detailed narrative history of Israel:
  • Joshua
  • Judges
  • Ruth
  • 1 Samuel
  • 2 Samuel
  • 1 Kings
  • 2 Kings
  • 1 Chronicles
  • 2 Chronicles
  • Ezra
  • Nehemiah
  • Esther

 

  • Poetry (5 books): These are also known as the Books of Everyday Wisdom or The Writings:
  • Job
  • Psalms
  • Proverbs
  • Ecclesiastes
  • Songs of Solomon

 

  • Major Prophets (5 books):
  • Isaiah
  • Jeremiah
  • Lamentations
  • Ezekiel
  • Daniel

 

  • Minor Prophets (12 books):
  • Hosea
  • Joel
  • Amos
  • Obadiah
  • Jonah
  • Micah
  • Nahum
  • Habakkuk
  • Zephaniah
  • Haggai
  • Zechariah
  • Malachi

Key Points to Remember:

  • The Old Testament is not a history book of the world, but primarily deals with the relationship between God and the nation of Israel.
  • The Old Testament traces the “seed promise” throughout history which brings us to Jesus (Gal. 3:15-4:31; Rom. 4:15).
  • Gentiles could be saved by converting to Judaism, by putting their trust in God as a Gentile, or by abiding in the law to themselves (Isa. 56:3,6-7; Rom. 2:14-16; Ja. 2:25-26; Acts 17:30).